Chemical management trainings as of 2020

News
19.12.2019

Chemical management trainings as of 2020

A corporate responsibility: reducing the use of hazardous chemicals on the production site and preventing risks.

As of January 2020, the Textiles Partnership's Basic and Advanced Training Programmes will be offered to factories with wet processes in various production countries. Systain will be responsible for the programme management and quality assurance and coordinate the training programmes for the Textiles Partnership and for interested partners.

The training programs enable companies to support their local production plants in establishing sustainable chemicals management and promoting the substitution of hazardous chemicals. This enables them to make a long-term contribution to reducing risks and promoting sustainable supply chains.

Companies can nominate their factories for the first run of the Advanced Trainings from now until the 31 January 2020 via advancedchemtraining@systain.com. The registration period for the Basic Trainings starts in January 2020.

You can find information about the Systain´s concept and the program of the trainings in our information package (DE and EN):

  1. Goals and opportunities of the trainings
  2. Systain Consulting GmbH: Presentation of the training concept     
  3. Goals and program of the Basic Trainings    
  4. Goals and program of the Advanced Trainings
  5. Impact Assessment and experience reports     
  6. Next steps (registration procedure)    
  7. Contact persons and direct links

To the Training Material.

For further information on financing and the programme, please visit the Website from Systain and in their training concept.

If you have any questions, please contact (Phone: +49 228 4460-3502; E-Mail: rahel.lemke@giz.de).

The contact person at Systain is Marie Oldopp (Tel.: +49 40 609 4618 22; E-Mail: marie.oldopp@systain.com)

Share this article

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on pinterest

DNP: Big stage for sustainable textile supply chains

News
22.11.2019

DNP: Big stage for sustainable textile supply chains

On 21 and 22 November we were present at the 12th German Sustainability Day in Düsseldorf. At our exhibition stand we informed about the work of the Textiles Partnership. Federal Minister for Economic Cooperation and Development Dr. Gerd Müller also dropped by.
100 Answers

At the congress, 100 speakers were asked how sustainable transformation can succeed and which solutions they offer. One of these speakers was Steering Committee moderator Frank Zach. At the opening plenary he described challenges of the textile industry, due diligence requirements as well as goals, processes and projects of the Partnership.

Dialogue forum on 'Ways to living wages'

How can brand and retail companies in Germany contribute to the payment of higher wages that will secure a decent life for workers in the textile production? What is the relationship between due diligence and legal framework conditions? What has been achieved so far and where is there still some catching up to do?

These questions shaped the dialogue forum with Sabine Ferenschild (SÜDWIND e.V.), Fabian Kusch (Bierbaum-Proenen GmbH & Co. KG), Ansgar Lohmann (KiK Textilien und Non-Food GmbH), Frank Zach (DGB Bundesvorstand) and Anosha Wahidi (BMZ). Afterwards the participants could also ask their questions in the Fishbowl.

Share this article

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on pinterest

Achieving more together - 5th Members' Meeting

News
19.11.2019

Achieving more together - 5th Members' Meeting

After the Partnership for Sustainable Textiles 2014 set out on its way to more sustainability in textile supply chains, the fifth Members’ Meeting took place on 19 November 2019. Around 110 members and guests met at the Tagungswerk in Berlin.
Difficult tasks and signposts to the future

Some agenda items are set at each Members’ Meeting: Greetings, annual report, review and outlook. An innovation this year was that the members could ask their questions to the Steering Committee and the Partnership Secretariat via an online tool. Many of the questions related to the new Review Process, which from 2020 will focus even more on the due diligence approach than before. Steering Committee moderator Frank Zach reported on the intensive negotiations in the Steering Committee. It was not until the day before the Members’ Meeting that the Partnerships decision-making body met in Berlin and adopted the overall concept of the revised Review Process.

In which direction should the Partnership develop in the future? Zach replied to this question: "As a multi-stakeholder initiative, we cannot conduct all debates, but we should be open to new debates, for example on sustainable fibres. We also need a great deal of external expertise for this. At the same time, however, we must be careful not to overdo it."

Jürgen Janssen, head of the Partnership Secretariat, described the future work of the Partnership: "We will continue our efforts to implement the due diligence approach across all three areas our work in the Partnership. Yesterday's decisions on the Review Process from 2020 clearly confirmed this once again. The recognition of our commitment to other initiatives and standards is also being intensively examined, particularly in order to avoid duplication of effort and increase our leverage. Wherever possible, we always ask the question of whether we can deal with issues and processes within the Partnership ourselves, or whether this can be done better through cooperation and recognition."

Motivation for the membership: Achieving more together

Members were invited to comment on their membership and involvement in Partnership initiatives via an online tool. 64% of the members underlined the basic idea of the Partnership and completed the sentence "We are members of the Partnership because..." with "because we achieve more together than alone". It was followed by "because network sharing is helpful to my work" (50%) and "because membership helps me advance sustainability issues in my organisation" (39%).

On participation in Partnership initiatives - "What factors would need to change for you to participate in a Partnership initiative? - the most important answers were: " Partnership initiatives that have more to do with our core business" (57%), "initiatives that are easier to participate in with less bureaucracy" (48%) and that you need "more time" (34%). These are important indications for the Steering Committee when it deals with the adjustments to Pillar 2 of the Partnership work (joint engagement).

Frank Zach also said about the concept of Partnership Initiatives: "Even below the threshold of a Partnership Initiative, there is a lot of motivation among the members to make a difference. In 2020, we will develop instruments that will make it possible to tackle urgent problems and give the necessary impetus. This must also be possible in addition to Partnership Initiatives and that is what we want to get going."

Political support for sustainable and fair supply chains

"We want a self-supporting upswing through fair trade with our partner countries, decent work and transparent supply chains," Dr. Maria Flachsbarth, Parliamentary State Secretary at the BMZ, described the Ministry's guidelines, also with a view to the National Action Plan for the Economy and Human Rights (NAP) and the German EU Council Presidency 2020.

Above all, she said, living wages were a major concern for her in order to break the cycle of poverty. For the next five years of the Textiles Partnership, she hopes for "more involvement in the Partnership Initiatives, a growing Textiles Partnership and the establishment of a European platform and as an important driver for sustainable and fair global supply chains. To achieve this, the BMZ will continue to support the Partnership ambitious work."

From the plenum to the workshops

From the stage and from the plenum, the members were divided into eight break-out sessions in the afternoon. They used these sessions to deal with various topics, to exchange ideas and to deepen their knowledge. These sessions were on the agenda at the general meeting:

Smart mix on stage

During the evening panel discussion, four female lawyers addressed the pointed question: "If there is a law, you don't need any more partnerships and buttons! Moderator Norbert Taubken chaired the discussion between Johanna Kusch of Germanwatch, Prof. Dr. Stefanie Lorenzen of the Berlin School of Economics and Law, Dr. habil. Birgit Spiesshofer from Dentons and Anosha Wahidi from BMZ. With clearly recognisable differences in focus, the panelists emphasised the importance of intelligent interaction between the various levers to improve the situation in the supply chains. Here, voluntary initiatives such as the Partnership for Sustainable Textiles with its differentiated, flexible and broad-based approaches play just as important a role as a credible, clear consumer approach such as the Grüner Knopf (Green Button) strives for and a framework-setting, effective regulation.

Share this article

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on pinterest

The course has been set - Annual Report 2019

News
19.11.2019

The course has been set - Annual Report 2019

The Partnership for Sustainable Textiles presented its annual report at the 5th Members’ Meeting on 19 November in Berlin. The data and facts from the year 2019 can be found graphically in the first part of the report. The second part focuses above all on activities that are decisive for the Partnership long-term success. These include internationalisation, for which the commitment to the OECD Due Diligence Guidance for Responsible Supply Chains in the Garment and Footwear Sector serves as a common, international frame of reference.

In addition, readers will learn what the Partnership initiatives have achieved with their local commitment over the past year. After almost exactly five years of existence, the OECD alignment and the planned strengthening of local engagement in 2019 have set the course for the further development of the Partnership.

Find the Annual Report in German and English.

Share this article

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on pinterest

Review process 2019

News
16.10.2019

Review process 2019

101 roadmaps, 96 progress reports, 2 exclusions

The 2019 review process ended on Friday 11 October. 101 members of the Partnership for Sustainable Textiles have passed the external audit and published roadmaps of what they are doing to improve sustainability in textile supply chains this year. In addition, 96 members provided progress reports on the measures they were able to implement in 2018. This year, five new members drew up a roadmap for the first time and were therefore unable to report on progress.

Two members - Allergo Natur Deutschland GmbH and askö GmbH - were unable to complete the audit before the deadline and were therefore excluded from the Partnership.

The review process was conducted for the first time in 2017. In the first year, 129 members drew up roadmaps, 35 of which were published voluntarily. Since 2018, the roadmaps have had to be published, and since this year this has also applied to the progress reports.

Since 2017 and for the third time, the following 35 Partnership members have successfully passed the audit and published roadmaps (in alphabetical order):

  • Adidas AG
  • ALDI Einkauf GmbH & Co. oHG (für ALDI Nord)
  • ALDI SÜD
  • Bierbaum-Proenen GmbH & Co. KG
  • Brands Fashion GmbH
  • Bundesregierung Deutschland
  • Christliche Initiative Romero
  • Cotton Made in Africa/Aid by Trade Foundation
  • Das Amt für Mission, Ökumene und kirchliche Weltverantwortung der Evangelischen Kirche von Westfalen (EKvW)
  • Deutscher Gewerkschaftsbund (DGB)
  • Deutsches Zentralinstitut für soziale Fragen (DZI)
  • Dibella b.v.
  • FEMNET e.V.
  • Gemeinschaft für textile Zukunft (GftZ)
  • Global Standard gemeinnützige GmbH (GOTS)
  • gotsutsumu GmbH
  • Handelsverband Deutschland – HDE e.V.
  • Hess Natur-Textilien GmbH
  • IG Metall
  • INKOTA-netzwerk e.V.
  • Kampagne für Saubere Kleidung
  • Katholische Frauengemeinschaft Deutschlands (kfd) – Bundesverband e.V.
  • KiK Textilien & Non Food GmbH
  • OEKO-TEX Service GmbH
  • Otto GmbH & Co. KG
  • Primark Limited
  • REWE Group
  • SÜDWIND e.V. – Institut für Ökonomie und Ökumene
  • Tchibo GmbH
  • Textilkontor Walter Seidensticker GmbH & Co. KG,
  • Trans Fair e.V.
  • Transparency International Deutschland e.V.
  • VAUDE Sport GmbH & Co. KG
  • VerbraucherService im KDFB e.V.
  • Verbraucherzentrale Bundesverband

You find detailed information on the reports in this article.

Share this article

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on pinterest

Partnership members purchase more than half of the organic cotton available worldwide

News
12.09.2019

Partnership members purchase more than half of the organic cotton available worldwide

The companies in the Textiles Partnership alone purchase more than half of the organic cotton available worldwide. This is shown by the 86 recently published progress reports. According to their own statements, the members procured around 800,000 tonnes of cotton in 2018, of which 83,000 tonnes was organic cotton. In 2016/17 around 118,000 tonnes of organic cotton were grown worldwide. Since the areas under organic cotton were already in transition at that time, the total quantity of organic cotton was probably already higher in 2018.

Common target for cotton

Since 2018, each member of the Partnership that procures cotton has been obliged to set itself an individual annual target to increase its production of sustainable cotton. The achievement of the target must be set out in the progress report in the following year. The target relates to increasing the proportion of organic cotton and other sustainable cotton (see Standards Systems for Sustainable Cotton). The members thus contribute to achieving the overarching objective for cotton:

By 2020, the Partnership members want to increase the proportion of sustainable cotton to 35 percent, of which at least 10 percent should come from organic farming or conversion to organic farming. By 2025 this share is to be doubled, i.e. to 70 percent sustainable cotton, 20 percent of which is organic cotton or cotton under conversion.

The progress reports show: Of the almost 800,000 tonnes of cotton procured by the Partnership members in 2018, around 10.5 percent already came from organic cultivation and 21.7 percent from other sources recognised as sustainable.

How much organic cotton is there worldwide?

In his Market Report 2018 Textile Exchange states that in 2016/17 out of 22,000,000 tons of cotton grown worldwide, 118,000 tons of organic cotton were produced - just 0.5 percent.

Textile Exchange is a global not-for-profit association that is a leader in the sustainable fiber and materials industry. Through a strategic cooperation between Textile Exchange and the Textiles Partnership, the international harmonization of fiber-related sustainability requirements and standards is to be promoted and the use of sustainable materials promoted.

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on pinterest

Garment industry reveals progress in sustainability

News
12.08.2019

Garment industry reveals progress in sustainability

Progress reports and roadmaps published

In their progress reports, all reportable members of the Textile Partnership disclose for the first time what they actually achieved in 2018 in order to implement decent working conditions, environmental protection and fair wages in their supply chain. In addition, all members have presented roadmaps for 2019 describing new activities to achieve the Partnership's goals. So far, 86 progress reports and 89 roadmaps have successfully passed the external review and can be found here . The rest will follow until September.

Partnership members archieved 80 percent of their goals set
The progress reports document that the Partnership members jointly implemented 1,100 projects that they set out to implement in their roadmaps 2018. This means that around 80 percent of the goals set for 2018 have been achieved. In the roadmaps for 2019, the members define more than 1,000 further concrete measures on the way to achieving the Partnership's goals.

Independent external experts have reviewed the roadmaps and progress reports for plausibility and the degree of target achievement. All the reports reviewed so far meet the current requirements of the Partnership and are published here .

Living Wages
In 2019, companies in the Partnership will for the first time have to take binding measures aimed at ensuring that workers can be paid living wages. However, brand and retail companies often have only an indirect influence on the wage structure in the supply chains, as the workers are employed by independent production companies. This means that, as a first step, Partnership members can influence wages by adjusting their purchasing behaviour. This includes above all their own pricing policy, the planning of order volumes and the specifications for production times.

Against this background, 34 companies have planned to analyse and improve their purchasing practices in 2019. Other member companies support initiatives that strengthen trade unions in producing countries and their position in collective bargaining. Others are cooperating with non-governmental organisations working to pay higher wages.

The sporting goods manufacturer Ortovox, for example, is implementing a pilot project with a supplier from Eastern Europe to promote better wages and working conditions. And Takko Fashion, in cooperation with one of its producers in India, is levying regional living costs in order to derive a basis for calculating living wages.

On the way ahead - socially and ecologically
Of the more than 1,000 measures defined in the current roadmaps, almost 200 relate to the gradual elimination of 160 hazardous chemicals from production, safe and good handling of chemicals and a uniform commitment to a wastewater standard.

REWE Group, for example, has set itself the goal of conducting training courses on chemicals management at ten production sites in India, Pakistan and Turkey. EDEKA wants to finance access to a platform with practical assistance for 25 production plants in order to improve internal environmental protection in production.

In 2019, companies must also demonstrate how they promote access to remedy and complaint mechanisms in their supply chains. In addition, members undertake to continuously monitor their own sustainability activities in the supply chain, select suppliers according to sustainability criteria and combat corruption.

2020 volume target for sustainable cotton almost reached
An important success was achieved with sustainable cotton: Of the total volume of cotton processed by members, around 10 percent now comes from organic cultivation and 22 percent from sources other than those recognised as sustainable. This means that the goal of using at least 35 percent sustainable and organic cotton together by 2020 has almost been achieved.

"If all alliance members - after all half of the German textile market - strive for binding targets, we can achieve a lot, for example in wages and workers' rights, in the substitution of chemicals, in environmental and resource protection and in the promotion of sustainable fibres", said Jürgen Janssen, head of the Partnership Secretariat: "In this way, the members contribute to the implementation of the Federal Government's National Action Plan for Business and Human Rights and make their actions transparent to society and politics."

Share this article

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on pinterest

We welcome three new associate members

News
09.09.2019

We welcome three new associate members

At its last meeting, the Steering Committee decided to accept Essenza Home, Kings of Indigo and Rademakers Fur and Fashion as associated members of the Textiles Partnership. Associate members can be companies that have signed the Dutch Agreement on Sustainable Garments and Textile (AGT).

Essenza Home has been producing home textiles for over 60 years, especially bed and bath articles. The company has its headquarters in Amerongen (Netherlands) and its central warehouse in Borken (Germany). It is important for ESSENZA HOME to maintain long-term relationships with its suppliers and to use sustainable materials.

Kings of Indigo is a Dutch jeans label headquartered in Amsterdam. The company focuses on sustainable materials and the durability of its jeans. Kings of Indigo uses 98 percent organic cotton and, as a member of the Fair Wear Foundation, is committed to fair working conditions in its supply chain.

Rademakers Fur & Fashion exclusively uses natural materials, especially leather and skins, to make leather and winter jackets. The company produces 95% of its collection in Europe, of which 42% is produced in its own factory at the headquarters in Sittard (NL). Rademakers Fur & Fashion is committed to animal welfare and environmental protection along its supply chain.

The cooperation between the German and Dutch Textiles Partnership exists since January 2018. The core of the cooperation is the offer of associated membership: member companies of one initiative can benefit under simplified conditions from the membership and in particular from the support offers of the other initiative if they comply with the required publication obligations. This means that the commitment to entrepreneurial diligence in accordance with the OECD (due diligence) is also recognised by the other alliance and duplication of work is avoided. Alsico NV became the first associated member when it joined the Textile Alliance in July 2018.

"It came as no surprise to me that the three companies had just applied for associate membership of the German Textiles Partnership, " said Pierre Hupperts, board member AGT: "At AGT, companies must publicly report in the third year of their membership what they are doing to implement sustainability requirements. Since AGT was founded in July 2016, some 50 companies now had to publish their reports. They can also make these reports available to other interested stakeholders and consumers, including in Germany, an important market for Dutch fashion companies. I am very satisfied with the benefits that companies derive from the cooperation between AGT and the German Textiles Partnership. The cooperation enables joint actions to prevent, reduce and compensate for negative effects in textile supply chains."

"The associated membership for AGT members who are also active in the German market is an important and visible step towards a stronger alignment of the two initiatives. On the basis of the OECD Due Diligence Guidance we would like to coordinate the activities of our Partnership and AGT in order to jointly develop the due diligence of brands and retail in Europe. This is the only way to achieve sustainable improvements in the producing countries of the textile and clothing sector - both for the workers and for the environment, said Dr. Jürgen Janssen, head of the Partnership Secretariat.

News from Tamil Nadu: Video and Website

News
05.07.2019

News from Tamil Nadu: Video and Website

How does the work of Partnership Initiatives actually look like? Who do we work with on the ground? In 3:30 minutes our new video provides insights and impressions of the work in Tamil Nadu.

The Partnership Initiative aims at systemically improving the working conditions in the textile and garment industry in Tamil Nadu, South India, and focuses on making the situation of women and girls in spinning mills more socially acceptable.

There is usually little transparency and there are often major challenges with regard to social standards and working conditions: exploitation through lump-sum contracts, wages below the official minimum wage rates, excessive overtime, repression of trade unions, lack of freedom of association and gender-based violence pose a threat to local employees.

Therefore, a training programme will support the planned establishment of complaints committees in 300 factories and inform workers and management about labour rights and complaint/grievance mechanisms.

In the video, Visalini S., one of over 150 trainers, talks about her work: “My job is to go and speak with the mill labourers and let them know about their rights and responsibilities and what are the incentives they have to get to be in a proper framework of organized labour.”

In addition, representatives of our implementing partner, the Multi-Stakeholder Initiative Tamil Nadu (MSI-TN), talk about their goals and activities. 

In an open dialogue, local businesses, non-governmental organisations and other stakeholders discuss how they can jointly initiate positive changes. In addition to the recently kicked-off dialogue fora at district and state level (see this article from late March), the first annual conference in March also served to promote the dialogue activities. A delegation of the Textiles Partnership also participated in the annual conference.

More detailed information on the new website

The multi-stakeholder initiative Tamil Nadu (MSI-TN) recently relaunched their website, which now provides more detailed information. For example, a list of factories can be used to track training activities. In addition, the MSI-TN informs about the dialogue forums at the district level and provides training materials (in Tamil). The newsletter of the MSI-TN provides regular updates on the activities and projects on site. Interested? Click Here for the website.  

The MSI-TN is one of the main implementation partners of our Partnership Initiative Tamil Nadu in South India, alongside the non-governmental organisation SAVE (Social Awareness and Voluntary Education). Further partners of the Partnership Initiative are FEMNET e.V., the German Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ), HUGO BOSS, KiK, OTTO GROUP and Tchibo, as well as the associated partners Brands Fashion and Transfair e.V.

Share this article

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on pinterest

Ten SDG on our agenda

News
17.06.2019

Ten SDG on our agenda

The Partnership´s contribution to the SDG

In 2015, the United Nations adopted 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDG). For the first time, they take into account all three dimensions of sustainability: social, environmental and economic. The SDGs cover all living and working contexts, from poverty reduction, climate protection and health care to overarching cooperation. Governments, business enterprises and civil society should work to eradicate poverty and make it possible for all people to live in dignity and full of opportunities. The goal is implementation by 2030, hence the name "Agenda 2030".

The activities of the Partnership for Sustainable Textiles also contribute to ten of the 17 SDGs. They intervene at many points in the global textile value chain. For example, the Partnership is committed to ensuring that workers receive living wages and that poverty is reduced. Less toxic chemicals in the bleaching or dyeing of fabrics benefit the health of workers in textile factories and protect the surrounding rivers and soils. In the roadmaps, the members of the Textiles Partnership commit themselves annually to their corporate responsibility and to binding Partnership goals. Individually and jointly, they thus make a contribution to Agenda 2030. How this looks exactly is shown in the SDG-Mapping.

Share this article

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on pinterest